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T-Mobile is making it easier for even more people to get 5G Home Internet service


T-Mobile is on a roll both in the wireless and broadband fields, gaining more and more customers and covering more and more ground practically every single day, with no slowdown in sight for the industry-leading expansions of the "Un-carrier's" increasingly popular services.

Of course, the geographic coverage of a mobile or home internet network doesn't always guarantee the towering subscriber numbers Magenta seems to be targeting of late, with many other factors and variables at play for prospective consumers across the nation.


In addition to things like speeds and prices, where T-Mo is almost always unrivaled, the convenience of opening a new account or expanding an existing one can sometimes make the difference between a satisfied and a not-so-satisfied customer.


Obviously, the "Un-carrier" knows that very well, currently working on making its fast-growing 5G Home Internet network just a tiny bit easier to join for some people. Specifically, those people who already rely on Metro by T-Mobile for their wireless needs and like to conduct their business in a good old fashioned brick and mortar store.


If you're part of that undoubtedly small category, you might be pleased to hear certain Metro retail locations have apparently started to accept T-Mobile Home Internet registrations earlier this week, with said service scheduled to expand to all such physical stores on February 24.


Only existing Metro by T-Mobile customers will be allowed to get 5G Home Internet access this way by adding the service to their voice accounts, and while it's unclear if that means any new discounts are coming, we highly doubt that will prove to be the case.


There's simply no way to go below $50 a month for typical home download speeds of anywhere between 35 and 115 Mbps (with much higher highs possible depending on your location and... many other variables), as well as no taxes, no fees, no equipment costs, no annual contracts, and perhaps most importantly, no data caps.





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